Possible Measles outbreak at Kings of Leon Concert

800px-Kings_of_leon

The Washington State Health Department has listed Kings of Leon’s March 28 show at the Seattle’s Key Arena as a source of possible measles exposure.  Anyone who was at the show should find out if they have been vaccinated for measles or have had measles previously. People who are un-vaccinated, aren’t sure if they’re immune, and develop an illness with fever or unexplained rash should consult a health care professional immediately. Public health officials urge them to call ahead to their clinic, doctor’s office, or emergency room before arriving so people in waiting rooms aren’t exposed. 

Other Locations of possible measles exposure*

Whatcom County

March 26: 7 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Lynden Dutch Bakery (421 Front St., Lynden)

March 27: 7 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Lynden Dutch Bakery

March 28: 7 a.m.-5 p.m., Lynden Dutch Bakery; 4:55-6:55 p.m. Lynden Wine and Spirits (610 Front St., Lynden); 5:15 p.m.-7:15 p.m., Shell gas station (6895 Guide Meridian; corner of Pole Road)

King County

March 28: 7:15 p.m. -10 p.m., Best Western Loyal Inn (2301 Eighth Ave., Seattle); 8 p.m.-midnight, Kings of Leon concert at KeyArena; 11 p.m.-3 a.m., Wasabi Bistro (2311 Second Ave., Seattle)

March 29: 1 a.m.-3 a.m., Best Western Loyal Inn (2301 Eighth Ave., Seattle); 7 a.m.-noon, Best Western Loyal Inn; 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Beth’s Cafe (7311 Aurora Ave. N., Seattle); 9:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m., Aurora Suzuki (7409 Aurora Ave. N., Seattle); 11:15 a.m.-2 p.m., Starbucks Coffee (102 Pike St., Seattle); 11:45 a.m.-2:45 p.m., Pike Place Market

Pierce County

March 29: 2:30 p.m.-4:45 p.m., Celebrity Cake Studio (214 E. 26th St., Tacoma); 2:45 p.m.-7 p.m., LeMay Car Museum (2702 E. D St., Tacoma), closed at 5 p.m.; 5:15 p.m.-8:45 p.m., Harmon Brewing Co. & Restaurant (1938 Pacific Ave., Tacoma); 7 p.m.-9:15 p.m., Safeway (1624 72nd St. E., Tacoma); 7:15 p.m.-9:30 p.m., Kmart (1414 72nd St. E., Tacoma)

* Times are estimates; some times overlap

Washington State Department of Health

 

OLYMPIA – A person who was confirmed with measles traveled to several western Washington public locations while contagious. Most people in our state are immune to measles, so the public risk is low except for people who are unvaccinated. People who haven’t been vaccinated or aren’t sure if they’re immune should ask a health care professional for advice. 

Public health officials say the Whatcom County woman in her 20s became contagious with measles March 26 after visiting a local family with measles linked to an outbreak in British Columbia. She worked at the Lynden Dutch Bakery while contagious. Measles is highly contagious and can cause severe illness with rash, fever, cough, eye irritation, and can be fatal. 

The woman traveled to Seattle for a Kings of Leon concert at Key Arena on March 28, when she also was at the Best Western Loyal Inn and the Wasabi Bistro. The next day, she was at Beth’s Café, Aurora Suzuki, Starbucks at First and Pike, and the Pike Place Market. On those same dates she visited several locations in Pierce County, including Celebrity Cake Studio, LeMay Car Museum, Harmon Brewing Company, and some department stores. A complete list of the locations and the times of potential public exposure are available online. 

Anyone who was in those locations at the listed times should find out if they have been vaccinated for measles or have had measles previously. People who are unvaccinated, aren’t sure if they’re immune, and develop an illness with fever or unexplained rash should consult a health care professional immediately. Public health officials urge them to call ahead to their clinic, doctor’s office, or emergency room before arriving so people in waiting rooms aren’t exposed. 

Measles is highly contagious even before the rash starts, and is easily spread when an infected person breathes, coughs, or sneezes — if you’re not vaccinated, you can get the measles just by walking into a room where someone with the disease has been in the past couple of hours. 

Washington typically has five or fewer measles cases per year; so far in 2014, there have been seven. Symptoms begin seven-to-21 days after exposure and is contagious for about four days before rash appears until four days afterward. People at highest risk from exposure to measles include those who are unvaccinated, pregnant women, infants under six months of age and those with weakened immune systems. 

Children should be vaccinated with two doses of measles, mumps, rubella vaccine, with the first dose between 12 and 15 months and the second at four-to-six years. Adults should have at least one measles vaccination, with some people needing two. The state Department of Health immunization program has more information about measles and measles vaccine.

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