The Music Book Interviews – Sightseer

The Music BookI can’t say enough about Sightseer. They write songs that have a timeless quality, songs that stick in the brain in a good way, pleasurable ear worms that will wiggle and squirm and settle comfortably into a corner of the brain much as one might do on the sofa on a cold and rainy afternoon, that feeling of not wanting to get up, of not wanting the music to stop. I know for a fact that I’ll still be putting their music on when I’m 70 and 80 and 90 (if I make it that long). In those far off days when I can’t even remember my name, the lines will come.

“I woke up in a red eye haze…”

And the nurse will say, “Yes, Mr. O’Leary, you haven’t been sleeping well. Here, take your medication.” But I’ll refuse for with the music will come clarity, and with clarity, I’ll keep singing.

“…been drifting through a thousand days.”

And the nurse will say, “Oh, that’s that song you always sing. I like that one.” She’ll leave the room then, and she’ll sing as she goes, “I don’t care if you go, and I don’t care if you stay…”

The song is “Red Eye Haze,” and to quote from the book, it “is one of the best sing-along jams ever, ever.” It is. And for that reason, Sightseer’s music is all over The Music Book, and they have two songs on the CD. See them live and you’ll be a fan. I guarantee it. And then you’ll be that person in the old folks home singing as the nurse comes in, “…’cause I’m already gone in a red eye haze.” And the nurse will sing with you.

Sightseer at the High Dive

And lucky for you, Sightseer is playing this Sunday at the High Dive for the book’s launch party. Like Lightning, another local band that should be more well known, is also playing. That’s one of the main points of the book. There’s all this great music happening at the local level, in the small clubs, music that should be heard and shared. We have only to go out to those clubs, pay the cover, and listen. My favorite bands these days are local, and with the book and the CD, the hope is that some of these bands will reach beyond local, that years from now old people all over the country will be singing these songs, that grandkids will look through CDs handed down, put one on and think, “Hey, that’s pretty cool.”

About davemusic

Dave O’Leary is a writer and musician living in Seattle. The Music Book, his second novel, was published by Booktrope in September 2014. In addition to writing for Northwest Music Scene, he has also had work published in The Monarch Review and on Slate.com. Visit his website at http://www.daveoleary.net. Photo by Stacy Albright, stacyalbrightimages.com.